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Well, that was embarrassing.

Local Chicago news station WLS-Ch.7 accidentally broadcasted a graphic that referred to the host city of the 2018 Winter Olympics as P.F. Chang’s instead of Pyeongchang. The mix-up between the names of the South Korean county and the Asian-inspired restaurant chain occurred Saturday and quickly went viral.

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Jayme Nicholas, a spokesperson for the ABC affiliate, told the Chicago Tribune the graphic was meant for a separate “satirical piece” created by sports anchor Mark Giangreco that asked viewers to come up with their own Olympic sport. However, Nicholas told the newspaper the graphic accidentally aired during a Saturday story read by anchor Mark Rivera. Nicholas also apologized for the error.

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P.F. Chang’s caught the mistake and tweeted about it.

The P.F. Chang?s Games 2018 have officially begun. What event would you dominate? Let?s see what you got.

— P.F. Chang’s (@PFChangs) February 13, 2018

Hopefully, the news station learned from the mistake.

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Tune in to NBC to watch the Winter Olympics.

Chicago house pioneer Larry Heard, who recorded under various names, most often Mr. Fingers, has announced his first new LP under the Mr. Fingers moniker since 1994’s Back to Love. Titled Cerebral Hemispheres, Heard’s new record arrives on April 13 via Heard’s own imprint Alleviated Records. Heard has also been announced for the 2018 Nuits Sonores festival in Lyon, France. In addition to the announcement, Heard has shared the first track from the new LP, “Electron.” Listen below.

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Heard’s last release under his own name was 2003’s Where Life Begins, though he released a remix of Dent May’s “Born Too Late” under the Fingers Club moniker in 2013. He is often credited with pioneering the slightly more soulful, melodic sub-genre of deep house; his 1986 track “Can You Feel It?” made our list of the top 40 deep house tracks of all time.

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The first season of the Donald Glover-helmed FX series Atlanta won Emmys for acting and directing, as well as a Golden Globe for Best Television Series, Musical or Comedy. The acclaimed show is back for its second chapter, entitled “Robbin’ Season,” on March 1. Today, FX posted a full-length official trailer, following a teaser premiered early last month. The new clip features Alfred/Paper Boi (Brian Tyree Henry) and Earn (Glover) dealing with clueless white DJs, weed deals, and couch crashers. Earn’s domestic life seems fairly cozy, though there’s a glimpse of him crashing in a storage space. Darius (Lakeith Stanfield) presides over and comments on the proceedings. Watch the new trailer below.

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In the wake of his third full-length masterwork DAMN., Kendrick Lamar has not disappeared. On the contrary he has felt as omnipresent as ever thanks to well-curated guest appearances, including Rich the Kid’s “New Freezer” (a current Billboard hit) and Jay Rock’s “King’s Dead,” off the TDE-helmed Black Panther soundtrack on which he stars across a host of tracks even when uncredited. His newest guest spot comes alongside fellow L.A. rapper Nipsey Hussle, who has managed to keep his name in the news over the past few years for reasons both good (“FDT”) and bad (homophobia). “Dedication” is about what you’d expect—a thick West Coast production over which both rappers sound very at home.

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Before the uncooperative Democratic legislators, the snooping special counsels, the fights with her father over whether an alleged child molester is an appropriate candidate to support in a senate race, Ivanka Trump’s most formidable enemies were catty fashion editors. Spin interviewed the first-daughter-to-be in 1998, back when she was a humble 16-year-old model, with the sorts of concerns you’d expect from a teenager of her milieu: whether to charge her lasagna lunch at Trump Tower to the family account, the rumors on campus at her prep school that she was chauffeured from class to class in a private limo, etc. At the time, she was grinding away in the celebrity division of Elite Model Management, sitting for Elle editorials and walking the runway for Betsey Johnson.

Even before Ivanka’s association with something so painfully gauche as white nationalist cryptofascism, the gatekeepers of the fashion world were reluctant to allow her into the club. One magazine editor was granted anonymity for the sole purpose of talking shit about her. If the fashion industry had a list of cardinal sins, “trying really hard” and “cool if you’re in Miami” would surely be among them:

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“If it wasn’t for her dad, she would at best be a B-model trying really hard to get work in Miami,” says an editor at one of the major fashion magazines, “and even then she’d have trouble, because contrary to popular belief, there is such a thing as a good model and bad model. Ivanka seems unable to show any emotion when modeling. She has a great body, but she doesn’t know how to use it.”

For all its casual pettiness, the article is most notable for the eerie ways in which it presages our current moment. Writer Kim France ticks off details from observations that would eventually become inescapable parts of the texture of American life: the Trump family’s unrepentant gaudiness, the buildings emblazoned with the future president’s name, the “chrome and glass and flower arrangements” of the Trump Tower lobby. The piece calls out Ivanka’s “surprising self awareness of the absurdity of being a Trump,” or appearance thereof—a dynamic she has continued to exploit two decades later, using her status as the family’s only credibly cosmopolitan member in an attempt to sell the idea that her father’s policies might be good for women and minorities.

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There’s also a sense that permeates the writing, of the unstoppable power of stardom and a little family money to elevate people into positions for which they are grossly unqualified. Without saying it outright, the piece conveys the idea that the young Ivanka Trump has no business being a model, and attained whatever small measure of success she found only on the strength of her father’s name. Her father, of course, has similarly little business being president. But being a Trump opens doors in America. “I think she’ll be a big model because right now is a big time for celebrities and personalities, and the Trump name is bigger than ever,” another industry insider gushes at one point in the piece. If only they could see us now.

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Read the full 1998 interview here.